MARCH CHEF DINNER

At the same time I scheduled a wine dinner at Charivari for 7pm on Thursday March 12th, I discovered that March 12th is Chef Johann Schuster’s birthday  – so I asked him to pick the menu. As he is German and white Asparagus season is upon us, I knew that spargle would be involved. What Chef Johann initially came up with looked great to me but may have been a little challenging for many diners. Per my request, he dialed it back (from challenging to adventurous) to achieve a broader appeal. In choosing the wines to pair with these dishes, I went with some of my favorites (as my birthday is three days earlier). So we will have wines from Perrier Jouet (PJ), Pedro Romero (PR), Pinot Gris (PG), and Pinot Noir (PN).

The MENU
Grilled Halloumi – White Asparagus Skewers
Perrier Jouet Belle Epoque, Champagne, 2006

White Asparagus Veloute with Marrow Dumplings
Pedro Romero Cream Sherry NV

Spiced Smoked-Miso-Maple-glazed Sable Fish fillet and grilled Asparagus with
Zind Humbrecht Pinot Gris Rotenberg 2009
Zind Humbrecht Pinot Gris Clos Windsbuhl 2009
Trimbach Pinot Gris Gold Label Hommage A Jeane 2000

White Asparagus – Wasabi Root Sorbet

Rack of Lamb herbed & Roasted and a Pinot Noir reduction,
Yukon Gold White Asparagus aux gratin with
Bouchard Pere & Fils Beaune Greves Clos de l’Enfant Jesus 1er cru 2009
Roblet Monnot Volnay Taillepieds 1er cru 2009
Michel Gros Morey St Denis Rue de Vergy 2009
Lecheneaut Nuits St. Georges Les Pruliers 1er cru 2009

Quark Donuts & melted Quark Ice Cream
Pedro Romero Pedro Ximenez Sherry NV

As always, we start with Champagne and in this case it is very fine Champagne indeed: Perrier Jouet Belle Epoque 2006, a top luxury cuvee from a top grand marque house. With the white asparagus soup (a signature of chef Schuster), we will enjoy a Cream sherry. With the Sable Fish (a specialty of the northern Pacific also known as Black Cod) fillet we will have three Alsace Pinot Gris wines (all grand cru quality) which will offer a revelation about the quality potential of Pinot Gris. While lamb is (for me at least) more closely associated with Bordeaux, the coming of Spring and the Pinot Noir reduction led me to Burgundy and a selection of four fine terroir from four great domaines.

This Chef Dinner will cost $150.00 per person including a 5% discount for cash or check or $157.89 regular. All taxes and tips are included. For reservations, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or at coburnsusan2@gmail.com.  Charivari is located at 2521 Bagby (77006) in Mid-Town Houston.

Vintage Focus on Bordeaux 2008

The Wine School at l’Alliance Française presents
A VINTAGE FOCUS ON BORDEAUX 2008
On Monday, March 2nd at 7pm, please join Spec’s fine wine buyer Bear Dalton at the Wine School at l’Alliance Française for a Vintage Focus on Bordeaux 2008. As it is not 2005 or 2010, the 2008 vintage was largely dismissied or even ignored by the press. Nevertheless, 2008 is a “Classic Vintage” that allows the typicity and terroir of each very specific place to shine un-obscured by the ripeness and alcohol of a “great vintage.” 2008 is the sort of vintage that proves Bordeaux’s place as a maker of great wines. Discussion will include details of the vintage and how the wines have developed. We’ll taste through 12 excellent red wines, all from 2008 vintage.

The line up:
Ch. d’Aiguilhe, Cotes de Castillon, 2008
Ch. Trottevieille, St. Emilion, 2008
Ch. La Croix St. Georges, Pomerol, 2008
Ch. l’Evangile, Pomerol, 2008
Domaine de Chevalier, Pessac Leognan,2008
Ch. Smith Haut Lafitte, Pessac Leognan, 2008
Ch. Branaire Ducru, St. Julien, 2008
Ch. Calon Segur, St. Estephe, 2008
Ch. Rauzan Segla, Margaux, 2008
Ch. La Tour l’Aspic, Pauillac, 2008
Ch. Batailley, Pauillac, 2008
Ch. Pontet Canet, Pauillac, 2008

This Vintage Focus on Bordeaux 2008 will cost $100.00 per person (Cash or Check) or $105.26 regular. The class will meet at 7pm on Monday, March 2, 2015 at l’Alliance Française. To reserve your spot, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or email coburnsusan2@gmail.com. Please note that when you reserve, you are “buying a ticket to an event.” If you are not going to attend the event, you must cancel at least 24 hours in advance or you may be charged.

L’Alliance Française is the French cultural center in Houston. Located at 427 Lovett Blvd., l’Alliance is on the southeast corner of Lovett and Whitney (one block south of Westheimer and two blocks east of Montrose).

The Seven o’Clock Wine Society welcomes Jane Ferrari of Yalumba

On Tuesday, March 3rd at 7pm, please join me in welcoming our always entertaining and ever informative friend Jane Ferrari, traveling winemaker of Yalumba, to l’Alliance Française for a tasting of Yalumba’s wines.

The ever popular Ms. Ferrari, who is a native of Barossa, will talk about where the wines come from and how they are made as well as the history and traditions of both Yalumba and the Barossa Valley. Jane Ferrari is a trained winemaker (educated at Australia’s esteemed Roseworthy College) who gets her hands dirty both in the vineyards and the wineries in Barossa but also travels the world telling the Yalumba story. She is down to earth and very entertaining in a way that must be experienced. Jane first visited Houston in October of 2003 and utterly charmed a group of over 60 wine fans. She has been back almost every year since and has “wowed” us all each time. In addition to information about wine, you may hear about Australian and American culture (or lack thereof), Baseball, Elvis, and other tangentially related topics.

We will taste:
Jansz Brut, Tasmania, NV
Yalumba Samuels’s Garden Viognier, Eden Valley
Yalumba Samuels’s Garden Old Bush Vine Grenache), Barossa
Yalumba Samuels’s Garden The Strapper (Grenache-Shiraz-Mourvedre), Barossa
Yalumba Samuels’s Garden The Guardian (Shiraz Viognier), B Barossa
Yalumba Samuels’s Garden Patchwork Shiraz, Barossa
Yalumba The Scribbler (Cabernet-Shiraz), Barossa
Yalumba The Signature, Barossa
Yalumba Museum Antique Tawny NV

Admission to this talk and tasting is a $30.00 (Cash or Check made out to the Houston Area Women’s Center only please), $20.00 of which is a donation to the Houston Area Women’s Center. The class will meet at 7pm on Monday, March 3, 2015. To reserve your spot for this class, please contact Susan Coburn at 713-854-7855 or coburnsusan2@gmail.comPlease note that when you reserve, you are “buying a ticket to an event.” If you are not going to attend the event, you must cancel at least 24 hours in advance or you may be charged.

L’Alliance Française is the French cultural center in Houston. Located at 427 Lovett Blvd., l’Alliance is on the southeast corner of Lovett and Whitney (one block south of Westheimer and two blocks east of Montrose). The Seven o’Clock Wine Society offers events and classes featuring speakers from around the world of wine. Most events are held at l’Alliance Française and all start at 7pm. The net proceeds of these events become a donation to the Houston Area Women’s Center.

The Houston Area Women’s Center
“For over 35 years, the Houston Area Women’s Center has worked relentlessly to help survivors affected by domestic and sexual violence build lives free from the effects of violence. Given our humble beginnings – we started with nine active volunteers answering donated phones – we are proud of how we have grown. Today, we have 115 paid staff, a counseling and administrative building, a residential shelter for 120 women and children, a state-of-the-art hotline call center and over 1,000 active volunteers.” – from HAWC.org

Punching and Pumping in Burgundy

When I travel to winegrowing regions, I taste a lot of wines – often 60-100 or more a day – and I ask a lot of questions. If you’re not going to do both, why travel? Sometimes the wines surprise me and sometimes the answers surprise me. I always learn something new. On my most recent trip to Burgundy, I learned a lot.

I’ve been going to Burgundy pretty regularly now for over 18 years. In that time, I’ve learned a lot about the winemaking but long before I ever visited Burgundy, I knew that Burgundian red winemaking meant fermenting Pinot Noir grapes in open-top fermenters and managing the cap using pigeage or “punch downs.” That’s what I had been taught, that’s what all the books said, that’s what I expected to see, and – when I got there – that is in fact what I saw. Open-top fermentation tanks with the apparatus necessary to punch down through the “cap” of skins that forms on the top of the juice. No surprise there.

Why is this necessary? To understand, we need to start at the beginning or at least the beginning in Burgundy. By the time winemaking made it to Burgundy, people knew how to make wine.

Naked Pipeage from "Naked Winemaking" at PalatePress.com

Naked Pipeage from “Naked Winemaking” at PalatePress.com

The whole bunches (whole clusters) of grapes were brought into the vat room and dumped directly into the vat. While the weight of those clusters on top broke some of the grapes on the bottom which released some juice, there wasn’t much juice in the vat. So someone had to get in the tank and move around to break up the grapes and release juice. Think the famous grape stomping scene from I Love Lucy. Only naked. And up to your chest. (There is a story that, as recently as ten years ago, a certain Vosne Romanee producer had the gymnastics teacher from a local school come work out in his tanks, but I digress.)

Pigeage plate

Pigeage plate

Once enough juice is released, the indigenous yeast from both the vineyard and the winery start the fermentation. The fermentation produces both heat and carbon dioxide. The heat helps break down more grapes and release more juice further fueling the fermentation. And the carbon dioxide makes it a bad idea to get back in the tank as you wouldn’t be able to breath. So from the start of fermentation on, the grapes were manipulated by pushing down through the cap with either a plate-on-the-end-of-a-pole or a sort of four-pronged-square-fork-on-the-end-of-a-pole. As carbon dioxide is heavier than air, it tended to stay on the surface of the fermenting juice so someone standing on top of the tank punching down with a long pole was OK. Not that anyone knew what yeast or carbon dioxide was. They were doing what experience had taught them. Once the juice was mostly released, it was run off and finished fermenting without the skins. Vatting times were generally short (no more than three days) and the resulting wines were light red in color and fairly light bodied.

Pigeage fork

Pigeage fork

As time passed, vatting times increased and the wines got (somewhat) darker and (a bit) richer. It turned out that there was a lot of color and flavor in the skins. It also turned out that there was a lot of bitterness in the stems. As time passed, some winemakers began removing the grapes from the clusters and just putting only the grapes (without any stems) in the vat. The grapes gave up their juice more readily as the network of stems did not provide structure to keep the grapes from getting crushed. Pigeage (punching down) was still the order of the day.

Longer vatting times put a higher priority on managing the cap. Left to itself, a tank of fermenting grape juice and skins will separate into the juice below and the cap floating on top. And the cap is further pushed up by trapped carbon dioxide release by the fermenting juice. Since there is flavor and color in the skins, the wine maker wants the skins in contact (as in mixed in) with the juice so that flavor and color can be extracted. So someone had to stand on top of the tank and, using a punch down pole, poke through the cap down into the fermenting wine. This both pushed grape skins (and pulp and trapped seeds) down into the wine and allowed wine to come up into the hole created and seep from there into the cap. In each vat,  several holes were punched through the cap once or twice a day depending on how active the fermentation was for 5-7 days. The other reason to punch down (or otherwise keep the cap wet) is that spoilage organisms can colonize if the cap is allowed to dry out.

Fast forward to modern times. The red Pinot Noir grapes of Burgundy are generally brought into the winery and run through a crusher/de-stemmer. Some producers both de-stem and crush the grapes. Some producers only de-stem so as to get whole berries into the tank and some add some whole clusters (anywhere from 10% to over 50%) to the tank. Some producers use all whole clusters.

Most Burgundian winemakers use a cold pre-fermentation maceration or “cold soak” before allowing the fermentation to start. The cold soak allows an aqueous (water-based) extraction to draw out color and flavor before alcohol is formed. Alcohol extracts tannins which are not soluble in water so tannin extraction doesn’t start until after the actual fermentation gets going and produces alcohol.

To cold soak, the winemaker either chills the tank down using the tank’s temperature control or (old school) adds dry ice. The goal is to get the temperature in the tank to below 12°C. The grapes are kept like this, macerating in their own juice for from three to as many as ten days. During this cold soak, the cap forms and must be managed. The options are to punch down or pump over. Punching down (pigeage) breaks open or crushes more grapes and releases more juice. Pumping over (remontage) takes the juice from the bottom of the tank and sprays it over the top to filter back down through the cap. The advantage to pumping over is that it is gentler. The disadvantage is that pumping over can introduce extra oxygen to the wine – and Pinot Noir tends to be oxidative so too much oxygen can be a real problem.

Conventional wisdom says that Pinot Noir producers punch down and because Pinot Noir is less extracted than say, Cabernet Sauvignon (which is usually made with pump-overs), that punching down is the gentler process. Both statements are less than fully true.

Starting with the second premise, standard plate-on-pole (or now more often plate-on-the-end-of-a-hydraulic-ram) punching down is actually a more aggressive extractive technique as the plate breaks, tears, and crushes the skins which allows more extraction of flavor and color. Pumping over is more gentle as only the juice is moved and no metal comes into contact with the grape skins.

The idea that most Burgundian Pinot Noir producers are using only punch downs as an extractive technique is more challenging. Just looking around certainly makes it seem that way. Most Burgundian wineries have lots of open top tanks whether wood, concrete, or stainless steel (or even plastic or fiberglass). And many have rails mounted on the ceiling above the tanks from which hangs a hydraulic ram with a punch-down plate at the bottom that can slide into position over each tank to make the punch downs.

But when you start talking to wine makers and asking detailed questions, another view emerges. Most of the best winemakers I saw on this trip say they are doing at least as much pumping over as punching down and some say they have virtually abandoned pigeage. Maybe they are pumping over in the cold soak, doing a little pigeage as the fermentation starts and then finishing with pump-overs. Some winemakers say there are a few days where they will do one pump-over and one pigeage. And some winemakers showed me a sort of four-pronged fork with which they were doing their pigeage rather than using the plate-at-the-end-of-the-pole. They say the fork is gentler and tears the grapes less but they are still pumping over as well.

The only winemakers that almost have to do at least some pigeage are those that are using all whole cluster as there is initially very little juice in the bottom of the tank. Until enough grapes break open to release enough juice to pump over, pigeage is necessary. Once there is enough released juice, they can (and many do) switch to pumping over.

And then there are the wineries, mostly newer, where there are no open tops or pigeage equipment. The first of these I noticed was several years ago when I visited Vincent Girardin on the east side of Meursault. On my most recent visit to Burgundy, I noticed that the Vignerons de Buxy co-op in Montagny had no open-tops and they acknowledged that all the wines are made with remontage (pumping over). The wines were clean and fresh and showed no oxidative problems so apparently they have it figured out. In visiting a number of other wineries they told me they were using the same sort of closed tanks (which I had incorrectly assumed were just for blending or white wine making) to vinify red wines. Who knew?

If Burgundy is so good – and (at least at the top of the quality pecking order where I work) it is – why change? There are several reasons. Grapes are riper. Winemakers now better understand aqueous (water) extraction versus alcoholic extraction. They better understand what happens with seeds during fermentation. They better understand what happens with stems during fermentation. They better understand both sugar ripeness and phenolic (stems, seeds, and skins) ripeness. The younger wave of winemakers has more education. All the better winemakers have more tools at their disposal. Newer better pumps make pump-overs gentler and less oxidative.

The conventional wisdom that the best Pinot Noirs from Burgundy are made using only punch-downs is incorrect. At this point, it is safe to say that most of the best properties are using both techniques (pigeage and remontage) on the same wine but it seems that there is (currently) as much or more pumping as punching going on.

Myth Busters would be proud.

Two February Wine Classes

Please join me for two new wine classes at The Wine School at l’Alliance Française. – Bear

02/09/15: VARIETAL FOCUS ON MALBEC
On Monday, February 9th at 7pm, please join Spec’s fine wine buyer Bear Dalton at the Wine School at l’Alliance Française for a Varietal Focus on Malbec. We will trace and taste Malbec from its homeland in the southwest of France to its new territories in Argentina and on to Chile and the US. Disscussion will include Malbec’s history, what makes it unique, and how it is made along with Malbec and food. Twelve Malbec wines will be tasted. The tasting will conclude with a couple of hundred-plus-dollar-a-bottle icon wines (one from France and one from Argentina).

The line up:
Pigmentum Malbec 2013
Alamos Malbec 2013
Montes Malbec Classic 2010
Ch. La Fleur De Haut Serre Malbec Cahors 2012
Achaval Ferrer Malbec 2013
Ch. de Mercues Malbec Cahors 2010
Cuvelier los Andes Malbec 2009
Fin Del Mundo Malbec Reserva 2012
Shannon Ridge Reserve Malbec 2010
Catena Zapata Malbec Argentino 2010
Ch. de Mercues Cuvee Icone 2009
Plus a surprise.

This Varietal Focus on Malbec will cost $60.00 per person (Cash or Check) or $63.16 regular. The class will meet at 7pm on Monday February 9th 2015 at l’Alliance Française. To reserve your spot, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or BearDalton@mac.com.

02/16/15: VINTAGE FOCUS ON BORDEAUX 2006
On Monday, February 16th at 7pm, please join Spec’s fine wine buyer Bear Dalton at the Wine School at l’Alliance Française for a Vintage Focus on Bordeaux 2006. As it is not 2005 or 2009, the 2006 vintage was initially under-rated by the press and has been ignored for the last several years. While 2006 is not a “Great Vintage,” it is a “Classic Vintage” that is now coming into its own as the wines emerge from the dumb stage. What is a “Classic Vintage?” One that shows what put Bordeaux on the world wine map. Which is to say a vintage in which each wine shows the typicity and terroir of the place. Discussion will include details of the vintage and how the wines have developed. We’ll taste through 12 excellent red wines, all from 2006 vintage.

The line up:
Ch Cap De Faugeres Cotes de Castillon 2006
Ch Pavie Macquin St Emilion 2006
Vieux Ch Certan Pomerol 2006
Ch Les Carmes Haut Brion Pessac Leognan Rouge 2006
Ch Haut Bergey Pessac Leognan Rouge 2006
Ch Cantemerle Haut Medoc 2006
Ch Potensac Medoc 2006
Ch Branaire Ducru St Julien 2006
Ch Batailley Pauillac 2006
Ch Calon Segur St Estephe 2006
Ch Rauzan Segla Margaux 2006
Ch Grand Puy Lacoste Pauillac 2006

This Vintage Focus on Bordeaux 2006 will cost $100.00 per person (Cash or Check) or $105.26 regular. The class will meet at 7pm on Monday February 16th 2015 at l’Alliance Française. To reserve your spot, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or coburnsusan2@gmail.com.

L’Alliance Française is the French cultural center in Houston. Located at 427 Lovett Blvd., l’Alliance is on the southeast corner of Lovett and Whitney (one block south of Westheimer and two blocks east of Montrose).

UPDATED – ANNUAL “MOSTLY CRU CLASSÉ” BORDEAUX TASTING at the Crystal Ballroom at the Rice

On Tuesday, January 20, 2015, please join Spec’s as we host 45 Bordeaux chateau owners, directors, and/or winemakers presenting 65 mostly Cru Classé Bordeaux wines all from the 2012 vintage in a walk-around tasting format at the Crystal Ballroom at the Rice. This is our fourth time to host such a delegation from Bordeaux. As each of the last three years’ events were smashing successes, the chateaux are coming back and they are bringing friends – so we will be showing more wines. Please scroll down for the complete list of well-known and highly-regarded chateaux.

The tasting will open at 4:30pm and run until 8:30pm, giving tasters ample time to taste the wines and visit with our guests from Bordeaux. The tasting will include a spread of artisanal cheeses and breads chosen to help absorb the wines and refresh the palate. We will taste from Riedel Degustazione (tasting) glasses. The 2012 Cru Classé Bordeaux Tasting will cost $80.00 total per person cash ($84.21 regular). To reserve your spot for this unique Bordeaux Event, please call Marlo at 832-660-0250 or email MarloAmmons@specsonline.com. The Crystal Ballroom at the Rice is located in downtown Houston at 909 Texas Avenue between Travis and Main. Valet Parking will be available.

THE WINES:
Dry Whites: Ch. Martinon (Entre Deux Mers), Carbonnieux, Domaine de Chevalier, and Smith Haut Lafitte (all Pessac Leognan Blanc).
Sweet Whites: Ch. Coutet (Barsac) and Suduiraut (with Lions de Suduiraut – both Sauternes)
Haut Medoc: Camensac, Cantemerle, Chasse Spleen, La Tour Carnet, Mauvesin, and Senejac
Margaux: Chx. Cantenac Brown, Ferriere, Brane Cantenac (and Baron de Brane).
Pauillac: Chx. d’Armailhac, Clerc Milon, Lynch Bages (with Echo de Lynch Bages), Haut Batailley, Grand Puy Lacoste (with Lacoste Borie), Haut Bages Liberal, Pibran, Pichon Baron, Pichon Lalande (with Reserve de la Comtesse)
Pessac Leognan Rouge: Chx. Carbonnieux, Clos Marsalette, Domaine de Chevalier, Pape Clément and Smith Haut Lafitte
Pomerol: Chx. Clinet, le Croix St. Georges, Gazin, La Pointe (with Pomerol de la Pointe)
St. Emilion: Chx. Grand Corbin Despagne, Berliquet, Canon La Gaffeliere and Clos de l’Oratoire, la Confession, Daugay, Fombrauge, Larcis Ducasse, Pavie MacQuin, and Vieux Clos St. Emilion.
St. Julien: Chx. Branaire Dudru, Gloria and St. Pierre, Hortevie, Langoa-Barton and Leoville-Barton, Leoville-Poyferre, and Talbot
Other Appellations: Chx. le Conseiller, Croix Mouton, and 20 Mille (all Bordeaux), Ampélia and d’Aiguilhe (both Castillon), and Puygueraud (Francs)

Four Upcoming Wine Events during January 2015

Two Wine Classes, a Grand Bordeaux Tasting,
and 
a Southern Rhone Dinner …

01/08/15 – ENJOYING WINE:
Tasting, Buying, Drinking, Serving, Pairing, Storing
Please join Spec’s fine wine buyer Bear Dalton for Enjoying Wine, an entertaining and informative way to learn more about wine and the some of the topics that inevitably go along with it. As we taste through 10 fine wines (sparkling, white, rosé, red, and sweet), we’ll cover topics such as tasting wine, buying wine, drinking wine, serving wine (temperature and glassware), pairing wine with food, and storing wine. All tasting will be from Riedel Degustazione stemware. Course notes will be distributed via email and may be found at BearOnWine.com. A selection of cheeses and bread will be offered during each class. Enjoying Wine will cost $50 per person cash ($52.63 regular). The course will meet at 7pm on Thursday, January 8th, 2015To reserve your spot, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or email BearDalton@mac.com.

01/12/15 – TASTE WINE LIKE A PRO:
The Basics of Tasting and Understanding Wine
Please join Spec’s fine wine buyer Bear Dalton for this introduction to truly tasting wine. Tasting is the basis of understanding wine, learning more about wine, and finding what sorts of wines we like best. Properly tasting wine with purpose helps all of this happen faster and with less frustration. Taste Wine Like A Pro will get you on the right track.

Topics will include:
- The basics of tasting
- The physiology of taste (sounds intimidating; it’s not)
- Tasting wine versus drinking wine
- Types of tasting
- Blind tasting and playing “The Options Game”
- Proper tasting glassware
- Tasting notes
Ten wines will be tasted. All tasting will be from Riedel Degustazione stemware. Course notes will be distributed via email and may be found at BearOnWine.com. A selection of cheeses and bread will be offered during each class. Taste Wine Like A Pro will cost $60 per person cash ($63.16 regular). The course will meet at 7pm on Monday, January 12th, 2015To reserve your spot, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or email BearDalton@mac.com.

Both of these Wine School classes will be held at l’Alliance Française, the French cultural center in Houston.  Located at 427 Lovett Blvd. (Houston, Texas 77006), l’Alliance Française is on the southeast corner of Lovett and Whitney (one block south of Westheimer and two blocks east of Montrose).

01/20/15 – ANNUAL “CRU CLASSÉ” BORDEAUX TASTING
at the Crystal Ballroom at the Rice
On Tuesday, January 20, 2015, Spec’s will host approximately 45 Bordeaux chateau owners, directors, and/or winemakers presenting over 60 mostly Cru Classé Bordeaux wines all from the 2012 vintage in a walk-around tasting format. This is our fourth time to host such a delegation from Bordeaux. As each of the last three years’ events were smashing successes, the chateaux are coming back and they are bringing friends – so we will be showing more wines. The complete list of well-known and highly-regarded chateaux is still coming together and will be announced soon.

The tasting will open at 4:30pm and run until 8:30pm, giving tasters ample time to taste the wines and visit with our guests from Bordeaux. The tasting will include a spread of artisanal cheeses and breads chosen to help absorb the wines and refresh the palate. We will taste from Riedel Degustazione (tasting) glasses. The 2012 Cru Classé Bordeaux Tasting will cost $80.00 total per person cash ($84.21 regular). To reserve your spot for this unique Bordeaux Event, please call Marlo at 832-660-0250 or email MarloAmmons@specsonline.com. The Crystal Ballroom is located in downtown Houston at 909 Texas Avenue between Travis and Main. Valet Parking will be available.

01/22/15 – A SOUTHERN RHONE DINNER at Charivari
On Thursday, January 22nd at 7pm, please join me, Bear Dalton, at Charivari Restaurant for our Southern Rhone Dinner offering a tour of 11 wines (a dry white, a dry Rosé, eight reds, and a sweet white) from seven appellations (plus a fine Champagne) perfectly paired with Chef Schuster’s menu of French classics.
 
The MENU
American Caviar, Goat Cheese Crème Fraîche aux Tartine with
Castelnau Brut Reserve, Champagne, NV

Bouillabaisse Marseillaise with
Domaine Vieux Chene “Blanc Seigneurs” Cotes du Rhone Villages Blanc, 2012
Domaine de “le Rosé de Marie” Cotes du Rhone Villages Rosé, 2013
Chateau St. Cosme “les Deux Albions” Cotes du Rhone Villages, 2011

Boeuf Bourguignon  & Fresh Egg Tagliatelle with
Domaine Cabasse “les Deux Anges” CdRV Sablet, 2013
Domaine Mourchon “Tradition” CdRV Seguret, 2011
Domaine l’Espigouette CdRV Rasteau, 2011
Montmirail “Cuvee Deux Freres” Vacqueyras, 2012
Chateau St. Cosme Gigondas 2012

French Cheeses with
Domaine Grand Tinel “Alexis Establet” Chateauneuf du Pape, 2009
Domaine Pegau “Cuvee de Reserve” Chateauneuf du Pape, 2011

Apple Tart Flambé with Salted Caramel with
Domaine Bernardins Muscat Beaumes de Venise 2012

This Southern Rhone Dinner will cost $140.00 per person including a 5% discount for cash or check or $147.37 regular. All taxes and tips are included. Attendance at this dinner is strictly limited to 24 people (including me). For reservations, please call Susan at 713-854-7855 or reply by email to BearDalton@mac.com.