Vintage 2015 (Mostly) Cru Classé Bordeaux Tasting

Tuesday, January 16, 2018 at the Crystal Ballroom at the Rice

Spec’s will host over 30 Bordeaux chateau owners, directors, and/or winemakers presenting 62 mostly Cru Classé Bordeaux wines all from the suberb 2015 vintage in a standup- and-walk-around tasting format. This is our seventh time to host such a delegation from Bordeaux and each of the previous events have been smashing successes.

The list of well-known and highly regarded Bordeaux wineries includes …
Pomerol: Chx. Clinet, Gazin, Croix St. Georges, and La Pointe (along with 2nd vin Ballade de La Pointe)
St. Emilion: Chx. Canon la Gaffeliere, Clos l’Oratoire, Daugay, Grand Corbin Despagne, La Confession, Larcis Ducasse, and Pavie Macquin
St. Georges St. Emilion: Ch. Cap St. George
Castillon: Chx. d’Aiguilhe and Ampelia
Francs: Ch. Puygueraud
Bordeaux: Chx. Croix Mouton and le Conseiller
St. Estephe: Chx. Phelan Segur, Lafon Rochet, and les Ormes de Pez
Pauillac: Chx. Pichon Lalande (with 2nd vin Reserve de la Comtesse), Pichon Baron (with 2nd vin Les Griffons), Pibran, Lynch Bages (with 2nd vin Echo de Lynch Bages), Grand Puy Lacoste (with 2nd vin Lacoste Borie), Clerc Milon, d’Armailhac, and Haut Bages Liberal
St. Julien: Chx. Branaire Ducru, Leoville Barton and Langoa Barton, Leoville Poyferrre, and Talbot
Margaux: Chx. Giscours, Cantenac Brown, Ferriere, du Tertre and Brane Cantenac (along with 2nd vin Baron de Brane)
Haut Medoc, Moulis, Listrac: Chx. Cantemerle, Chasse Spleen, Camensac, Mauvesin Barton, and Senejac
Pessac Leognan Reds: Chx. Carmes Haut Brion, Carbonnieux, Domaine de Chevalier, Smith Haut Lafitte, Clos Marsalette, and Haut Bailly with 2nd vin La Parde de Haut Bailly
Dry Whites: Domaine de Chevalier, Smith Haut Lafitte, and Blanc de Lynch Bages (2014)
Sweet Whites: Chx. Suduiraut (along with 2nd vin Lions de Suduiraut) and Coutet

As you can see, We’ll be tasting great wines from every Major appellation in Bordeaux.
The tasting will open at 4:30pm and run until 8:30pm, giving you ample time to taste the wines and visit with our guests from Bordeaux. The tasting will include a spread of artisanal cheeses and breads chosen to help absorb the wines and refresh the palate. We will taste from Riedel Degustazione (tasting) glasses. The Vintage 2015 Mostly Cru Classé Bordeaux Tasting will cost $100.00 per person (including a 5% discount for cash or check, regular price is $105.26). To purchase your ticket, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or coburnsusan2@gmail.com.

The Crystal Ballroom at the Rice is located in downtown Houston at 909 Texas Avenue between Travis and Main. Valet Parking will be available.

If you buy a ticket and will not be able to attend, please cancel at least 24 hours before the event. No shows and later cancellations will be charged.

Of Interest

LUXURY CHAMPAGNE Tasting Benefiting Sonoma Fires Relief – 
There are still a few seats left for this coming Monday’s (12/4/17) extraordinary and (at least in my experience unprecedented) look at most of the very top Luxury Cuvee Champagnes in a comparative format. For more information, please see https://bearonwine.com/2017/11/27/luxury-cuvee-champagne-benefit-tasting-for-sonoma-fires/

BORDEAUX 2017
For a good, informed, even first look at the 2017 vintage in Bordeaux from one of the best Bordeaux writers working today, please see Jane Anson’s Decanter article at
http://www.decanter.com/learn/vintage-guides/en-primeur/bordeaux-en-primeur/bordeaux-2017-how-it-is-shaping-up-380695/

MAYBE THE BEST NAPA VALLEY CHARDONNAY I’ve tasted in over two years!
I don’t often drink California Chardonnay but when I do, this 2016 from Trefethen is the kind that gets me going. Delicious, balanced, elegant. The integrated oak and subtle richness are components here but fruit and freshness are what this is all about. This is not “Cougar Juice.” Rather, it is Chardonnay that a Burgundian winemaker would recognize and drink.

TREFETHEN Estate Chardonnay, Oak Knoll District of Napa Valley CA, 2016  ($29.99)
100% sustainably grown Chardonnay, half of which is given an indigenous yeast fermentation and half of which is innoculated. 69% is barrel fermented witht he balance fermented in tank. 8% gets malo-lactic fermentation. the assemblage is aged 9 months in all French oak barrels (19% new).      Straw color with well formed legs; dry, medium light-bodied with fresh acidity. Best Trefethen Chardonnay I have ever tasted and maybe the best Napa Chardonnay I’ve tasted in two or three years. Citrus and a bit of mixed apple fruit with mineral and freshness. Integrated and pure. California answer to 1er cru Chablis. Delicious.  BearScore: 93+.

Bordeaux Reboot

7pm on Tuesday, November 14th at The Wine School at l’Alliance Française

A few weeks ago, I attended a very frou-frou Bordeaux lunch with some people who are reputed to be big collectors of Bordeaux. One of them engaged me in conversation telling me that, while he still drank the Bordeaux wines in his cellar, he no longer bought Bordeaux because “the good wines were just too expensive.” He continued by saying he was buying “only new world wines now.” I think I actually sputtered when he said that. I would contend that there is more value in Bordeaux now than ever before. If you doubt that (heck, even if you don’t doubt), then please join me for Bordeaux Reboot (7pm Tuesday November 14 at the Wine School at l’Alliance Française) and give me the chance to prove my case and reboot your thinking on Bordeaux. We are in a golden age of delicious Bordeaux wines from all areas and at all price points. In this seminar tasting, we’ll look at wines from around Bordeaux that offer quality and value. Topics of discussion will include vintages, the styles of Bordeaux, and the grape varieties and techniques used to make the wines. Bread and cheese will be served. All wines will be tasted from Riedel Degustazione (tasting) glasses. The full ticket price will be donated to the Houston Area Women’s Center.

The following twelve Bordeaux wines will be served:
Les Charmes Godard Blanc Cotes De Franc 2015
Ch Le Conseiller Bordeaux 2014
Ch D’aiguilhe Cotes De Castillon 2014
Ch Laplagnotte Bellevue St Emilion 2014
Ch La Pointe Pomerol 2014
Ch Carbonnieux Rouge Pessac Leognan 2014
Ch Tour Salvet Haut Medoc 2014
Ch Pontac Phenix Haut Medoc 2012
Ch Pontoise Cabarrus Haut Medoc 2012
Ch Haut Bages Liberal Pauillac 2014
Ch Pontac Lynch Margaux 2014
Petit Vedrines Sauternes 2012

To buy your ticket, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or coburnsusan2@gmail.com. The cost of this class is a $30 donation (cash or check only please) to the Houston Area Women’s Center.

About The Houston Area Women’s Center:
For over 35 years, the Houston Area Women’s Center has worked relentlessly to help survivors affected by domestic and sexual violence build lives free from the effects of violence. Given our humble beginnings – we started with nine active volunteers answering donated phones – we are proud at how we have grown. Today, we have 115 paid staff, a counseling and administrative building, a residential shelter for 120 women and children, a state-of-the-art hotline call center and over 1,000 active volunteers.

L’Alliance Française is the French cultural center in Houston. Located at 427 Lovett Blvd., l’Alliance is on the southeast corner of Lovett and Whitney (one block south of Westheimer and two blocks east of Montrose).

If you buy a ticket and will not be able to attend, please cancel at least 24 hours before the class or you may be charged. Later cancellations will not be charged if we can fill the seat. This is often case as we regularly have waiting lists for these classes.

With almost 40 years experience in the wine business and 30 plus years experience teaching about wine, Spec’s fine wine buyer Bear Dalton is one of the top wine authorities as well as the most experienced wine educator in Texas.

Mature Bordeaux Dinner – SOLD OUT!

NOW SOLD OUT!

At 7pm on Thursday, November 2nd, please join me, Spec’s fine wine buyer Bear Dalton, at Lucio’s on Taft Street for a fun and delicious look at mature Bordeaux paired with Lucio’s simple-but-food-friendly menu.  We’ll start with Champagne after which we will go directly to two 1996s paired with duck. After that, three 1995s with hanger steak will be followed by two 1989s with the cheese. We’ll finish up with a glass of 1977 Cockburn’s Vintage Porto, a wine whose very existence was long denied.

THE MENU
Passed Mini Crab Cakes with
Andre Clouet Cuvee 1911 Champagne, NV

Grilled Duck Breast with fennel puree,  spinach, date marmalade, and duck jus
Ch. Lynch Bages, Pauillac, 1996 
Ch. Calon Segur 1996

Hanger Steak with stacked potato and chimichurri
Ch. Rauzan Segla 1995  
Ch. Lynch Bages, Pauillac, 1995 
Ch. Cos d’Estournel 1995   

A selection of Cheeses with
Ch. Lynch Bages, Pauillac, 1989
Ch. Pichon Baron, Pauillac, 1989 

The Port
Cockburn’s Vintage Porto, 1977

This unique Mature Bordeaux Dinner will cost $270 per person including a 5% discount for cash or check (or $284.21 regular). All taxes and tips are included. For reservations, please reply by email to BearDalton@mac.com. Please include a call back number in your email reply. Lucio’s is located at 905 Taft. Hope to see you there.

Meet and taste with Domaine Baron Rothschild Winemaker Diane Flamond

On Tuesday, October 24 at 7pm, please join me, Spec’s fine wine buyer Bear Dalton, in welcoming Diane Flamand, winemaker for DBR (Domaine Baron Rothschild – Latite), to the Wine School at l’Alliance Française for a tasting of DBR’s excellent wines. The net proceeds will benefit The Houston Area Women’s Center (see below).

Diane makes the wines sold under the Domaine Baron Rothschild label for the Ch. Lafite branch of the Rothschild family. She is an entertaining and informative speaker with in depth knowledge of the high quality commodity business of Bordeaux who has elevated these wines she is responsible for. I have heard her speak to groups so I can assure that both she and the wines will be well received.

We will taste:
Champagne Barons de Rothschild Brut NV
DBR Reserve Speciale Bordeaux Blanc
DBR Reserve Speciale Bordeaux Rouge
DBR Reserve Speciale Medoc
DBR Reserve Speciale St. Emilion
DBR Reserve Speciale Pauillac
Moulin de Duhart, Pauillac
Château de Cosse, Sauternes

To buy your ticket, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or coburnsusan2@gmail.com. The cost of this class is a $20 donation (cash or check only please) to the Houston Area Women’s Center.

About The Houston Area Women’s Center:
For over 35 years, the Houston Area Women’s Center has worked relentlessly to help survivors affected by domestic and sexual violence build lives free from the effects of violence. Given our humble beginnings – we started with nine active volunteers answering donated phones – we are proud at how we have grown. Today, we have 115 paid staff, a counseling and administrative building, a residential shelter for 120 women and children, a state-of-the-art hotline call center and over 1,000 active volunteers.

L’Alliance Française is the French cultural center in Houston. Located at 427 Lovett Blvd., l’Alliance is on the southeast corner of Lovett and Whitney (one block south of Westheimer and two blocks east of Montrose).

News from Bordeaux from Ivanhoe Johnston of negoçiant Nathaniel Johnston:

On September 1, our friend Ivanhoe Johnston (who many of you have met at our annual Bordeaux event at the Rice downtown) sent me the flowing information from Bordeaux which I share with you with his permission.

Ivanhoe writes:

At the end of August, we’d like to give a last update before the harvest:

August in Bordeaux has been fairly dry (+/-20 mm of rain in general) and fairly sunny and hot but not extremely hot. This was very good for the maturation of the white and will likely prevent from having a “too sunny” vintage.

The first white grapes were harvested the last week (August 21-26 with Haut Brion picking on August 22nd) and the first of reds picked this week (August 28 – September 2) even if some real action will begin next week (after September 3).

Most properties will be in full harvest by the week of the September 11 altough in the Medoc most likely the week of the 18th…so this is an early harvest vintage so far running about 10 days ahead of last year (2016).

After some days of extreme temperatures the last 2 week (few day at 30°C and some even over 35°C which raises sugars and makes alcohol potentials increase quickly) , weather should be more normal the next weeks (highs around 24°C) with cold nights (which is extremely good for maintaining acidity).

For those who have not suffered from the spring frosts, there is a nice quantity of grapes but they are rather small with not too much juice which is a reason why people would be pleased with a little of rain.

Still, it all looks very good with the potential of a rich and intense vintage. We all are afraid of a hail strom as it happens around Potensac last Sunday…but apart from that we should do again have at least a very nice vintage.

In other summer Bordeaux news :

Ch. Phelan Segur has been sold with some details still to be finalized but it looks as though the management team will remain in place.

Ch. Troplong Mondot had been sold and Aymeric de Gironde (former GM of Cos d’Estournel) will now run the property.

Ch. Berliquet has been taken over by Canon but the wines will be kept separate (here again some details are not yet final).

Due primarily to the spring frosts, total 2017 production is forecast down 41% in Bordeaux but, due to their superior terroir, many of the top château are far less affected.

 

On July 24, 2017 Ivanhoe Johnston provided the following:

As most of you know, Bordeaux has been quite affected by the frost at end of April. This as a massive impact on the global quantity that Bordeaux will produce but has little or no impact at this stage on the potential quality of the vintage.

Here is a closer look at the situation, area by area:

Medoc: most of properties along the Gironde Estuary were not affected by the frost because they were “protected” by the warmer water. Therefore most classified growths from the Medoc are ok, especially with their first wines (grand vin) that are usually mainly done on the best terroir. Their second wines may be more seriously affected. Property like Lagrange for example suffered more on terroir for the Fiefs de Lagrange. Properties like Poujeaux, Chasse Spleen, Camensac, and Latour Carnet that are further from the river were more affected. Ch. Mauvesin Barton will not have a crop.

Pessac is fine even if Pape Clement had been affected. Leognan was more affected with Fieuzal suffering heavily this year.

St Emilion: The plain (lower lying and closer to the Dordogne) is heavily affected as well as the area of Corbin (with almost no crop left) but the plateau is mostly fine. Of the major names, the most affected, as far as we know, are Canon Gaffeliere and to a lesser lesser extent Figeac & Cheval Blanc.

Pomerol: In general, the plateau is fine but the rest of the appellation is heavily affected. Lower lying chateaux such as like La Pointe and Taillefer were really strongly affected.

If we speak only about the chateaux that had no frost, situation is quite nice. Flowering went well with potential quantities looking good (maybe slightly less than last year but it is too early to say with certainty). Veraison has started. Here and there people did a light green harvest and only light leaf thinning to avoid sun-burned grapes.

It is likely to be a early harvest, which is rather a good sign for quality. Some whites are likely to be picked the week of August 20th and some reds by the 4th of September. This early harvest might offer the one who suffer more of the frost to harvest some “2nd crop” grapes in the middle of October so there can be a delay of a +/- one month the general harvest and a potential second harvest from recovering frost affected vineyards.

Some of the growers say that things are now looking good but the weather over the next two months will ultimately determine the quality of the vintage.

The Bordeaux weather forecast is now predicting a rather hot and dry August and a “normal” September.

Geek Speak: FARMING PHILOSOPHIES

When I talk about fine wine, the first two considerations are Person and Place. Person refers to the living Motive Force that drives the quality of a wine or wines. That person may be an owner or and estate manger or a winemaker but whoever it is has, within the context of the property in question, the power to effect quality in positive fashion. They are the decision maker behind the wine. Place refers to the specific vineyard or vineyards where the gapes are grown. The Person can have a great deal to do with the Place. The Person choses to farm in the Place, chooses how to farm, and chooses how to make the wines.

IN THE VINEYARD
Those Farming choices (a sort of philosophy of farming) range from chemical-driven commercial agriculture through sustainable farming to organic farming and on to biodynamic farming.

Commercial farming is farming with a lot of chemical inputs in the form of herbicides, pesticides, fungicides, and fertilizers, often with a big dose of irrigation. Practitioners say commercial farming gives them the most control and I suppose they’re right. the problem is that there is little if any microbial or beneficial insect or other life left in the vineyard with all that control so the soil is dead and the vine needs the fertilizers in order to grow.

Sustainable Farming means farming in such a way that the land is nourished and not poisoned. Sustainable grape farming often means using organic methods, fertilizers, and solutions wherever feasible but allowing non-poisoning chemical treatments (that nevertheless disqualify the farm as “organic”) when they are necessary. The idea of sustainable farming is to keep nutrients in the soil and pollutants out of the soil and plants while still maintaining an economically viable crop.

Organic Farming excludes the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides and plant growth regulators. As far as possible organic farmers rely on crop rotation, crop residues, animal manures, and mechanical cultivation to maintain soil productivity and tilling, hoeing, and plowing to supply plant nutrients, push down roots, and control weeds. Insect and spider control is accomplished by using sexual confusers, facilitating predator insects, and building bat boxes to encourage bat populations. Birds and rodents can be controlled by encouraging predators (owls, hawks, and even barn cats) to take up residence near and hunt in the vineyards. Some wineries keep cats to hunt gophers and install raptor perches so hawks that hunt grape eating birds and rats will have a vantage point from which to hunt. International organic farming organization IFOAM states “The role of organic agriculture, whether in farming, processing, distribution, or consumption, is to sustain and enhance the health of ecosystems and organisms from the smallest in the soil to human beings.”

Biodynamic Farming is an ecological and sustainable farming system, that includes the principles of organic farming. It is based on eight lectures given by Rudolf Steiner shortly before his death in 1925. Steiner believed that the introduction of chemical farming was a major problem and was convinced that the quality of food in his time was degraded. He believed the source of the problem were artificial fertilizers and pesticides, however he did not believe this was only because of the chemical or biological properties relating to the substances involved, but also due to spiritual shortcomings in the chemical approach to farming. Steiner considered the world and everything in it as simultaneously spiritual and material in nature and that living matter was different from dead matter.

While all the elements of organic farming are present, biodynamy further specifies homeopathic treatments and a timetable dictated by celestial (mainly moon and planet) events. Biodynamic Farming is seen by many as organic farming taken to a the next level. Most scientists say that the preparations used in biodynamy are too dilute to have an effect. Nevertheless, biodynamic grape growing often produces fruit of fantastic quality and that fruit is often made into fantastic wines. My original thinking on biodynamic farming was that the bump in quality came because adherents of biodynamic practice often spend more time in the vineyard than other farmers. That would validate the old French saying that “The best thing for a vine is the sound of the vigneron’s (vine-grower’s) voice.” I now know that there is a whole lot more to it.

Organic and biodynamic farming encourage the presence of a robust microbial (yeasts, bacteria, fungi, etc.) population in the vineyard. These microbes are in the soil and on the vines and even on the surrounding flora in the vineyard. This is not new. What is new is that we now understand that this complex inter-related microbial population is the mechanism that brings terroir (specificity of place) into the wine. Each vineyard has its own specificity and that uniqueness is expressed in its microbial population. All the aspects of terroir are important but the microbes are the way they get into and are expressed by the wine.

IN THE CELLAR
When it comes to wine, “organic” come in various shades or degrees. While organic farming usually produces excellent grapes, organic winemaking often produces pretty lame wines. There is some specialized lingo here. Here’s the scoop on Organic Wine vs. Organically Grown.

Organic Wine is wine made using organic methods from organically grown grapes. Organic winemaking precludes the use of sulfur in the winemaking, cellaring, and bottling processes. Because sulfur is not used, organic wines may be sought after by those suffering from sulfite allergies. For most others, organic wines are to be avoided due to their inherent flavors of oxidation and spoilage.

Sulfur, SO2 – Sulfur in the form of SO2 (sulfur-dioxide) is widely used in winemaking both as an anti-oxidant and as an anti-microbial agent. It is virtually impossible to make “clean” wines without sulfur. Judicious use of SO2 helps keep wines fresh tasting and stops the microbiological spoilage that can give many so-called organic wines off putting (often dirt, sometimes fecal, occasionally chemical) aromas. Wine made using sulfur may not be labeled “organic”.

Sulfur may be used at different places in the process. While many commercial wineries dose the incoming grapes with sulfur dioxide to kill off anything microbial coming in from the vineyard, Fine Wine producers not only don’t do that, they encourage those microbial populations to transition in to the winery and encourage microbes indigenous to the winery as well. Those indigenous winery microbes are the mechanism by which the character of the winery get in to the wine. So there are actually two terroirs present in a properly made wine: the terroir of the vineyard and the terroir of the winery.

Organically Grown on a wine label means just that; the grapes were grown using organic farming methods but the winemaking was not organic – at least in that sulfur was used. Organically Grown incorporates the best of both worlds: great farming and clean wine making. Much of the best grape farming done today incorporates as much organic and even biodynamic principle as possible. Many wineries are leaning that direction and they seem to be divided into three camps: Sustainable Farming, Organic Farming, Biodynamic Farming. Some practice but never enter the certification process, some certify at on level but practice at the next rung up. Quintessa is certified as biodynamic while Opus One farms using biodynamic principles but apparently has no plan to get certified as biodynamic.

The more organic or biodynamic the farmer works, the better the fruit will be (all other things being equal) and the better the health of the soil. Better fruit and healthier microbes give the best raw materials to make fine fine.  Responsible winemaking with sulfur dioxide added until after malo-lactic fermentations are complete allows both terroirs to translate into the finished wine while stopping spoilage and oxidation.