Thinking About 2017 Bordeaux

To the surprise of many, I just completed my twenty-second consecutive annual trip to Bordeaux to taste the new vintage en premier. I have a number of thoughts on the quality and style of the 2017 vintage which, like every vintage, was heavily influenced by the weather.

Bear Dalton at Ch. Carbonnieux in April 2018

To recap of the weather in Bordeaux in 2017: The year started dry and there was some early warmth leading to an early budding of the vines. Everything was looking good until disaster struck beginning on the morning of April 27 with temperatures as low as 25°F in some areas. The frost hit certain terroir and spared others. The left bank vineyards closer to the Gironde were mostly spared and many vineyards all over Bordeaux located on hilltops and plateaus were mostly spared. Vineyards in dips and valleys, on slopes and at the bottom of slopes were the most heavily affected. Within a couple of days, the frost effect was pretty well known. Some chateaux lost their whole crop. Others lost amounts ranging down from 100% of their grapes to having just a few rows or even a few vines affected.

The frost freeze-burned the tender young buds and leaves. Frost affected vines either produced no grapes or a minimal amount of grapes from a second later crop set. A week after the frost, many of the most affected vineyards looked like they had been burned.

Early summer brought some welcome rains that recharged the soils and energized the vines. July and August offered warm days and cool nights that ripened the grapes and burned off the pyrazines (natural compounds in grapes that can lend a green bell-pepper flavor to the finished wines) while maintaining the wine’s freshness and acidity.

A wild card came in September rains that delayed the harvest, especially for Cabernet Sauvignon (the latest ripening of the major varieties).

What does all that mean? Except for the frost, this was a fairly-normal, good but not perfect weather year in Bordeaux. Despite the sometimes devastating frost-related reduction in crop, the growers with better terroir were generally happy with the grapes they harvested and felt like they could make fine wine. And a great many did.

For better or worse, 2017 will carry the stigma of being a frost vintage. The partially informed who stop there will likely avoid the wines. The more informed (that would be you if you keep reading) will likely find a number of wines that will make you very happy.

A Tale of Terroir
So who made fine wine and who didn’t? Many but not all of the best terroir seemed almost exempt from the frost. Many of the lesser terroir were not so lucky.

The band of vineyards running along the D2 road that runs north from the city of Bordeaux through the Haut Medoc were mostly either lightly affected or undamaged. Vineyards between the road and Gironde estuary fared the best but many vineyards just west of the road also fared pretty well. The further west the vineyard was, the more damage from frost. Moulis and Listrac were pretty much wiped out, as were parts of the Medoc AOC at the north end of the peninsula. In Pessac Leognan, the top properties fared fairly well but some of the lesser known sites took a hit, Carbonnieux lost maybe 30% of production to frost but next-door neighbor Haut Vigneau lost its whole crop. Parts of Graves and Sauternes were hard hit as well.

Some properties in St. Emilion and Pomerol were mostly unaffected while others were wiped out. In Pomerol, Ch. Petrus and Ch. Le Pin were mostly unaffected while Clinet and Vieux Ch. Certan were lightly effected and La Pointe lost their whole crop. Ch. Nenin made a grand vin (1stwine) from un affected vineyards but did not make a 2ndwine as the vineyards that would normally go into Fugue de Nenin were fully affected by the frost. Some St. Emilion properties were un affected but two wines we but every year (Ch. Laplagnotte Bellevue and Ch. Grand Corbin Despagne) lost their whole crop. More common in St. Emilion were chateau with anywhere from 30-to-70 percent of normal production. Typical of this is Ch. Canon La Gaffeliere, Ch. Figeac, and Ch. Cheval Blanc, all of which are great terroirs that took a big hit in sloping areas that usually produce great grapes.

Other areas were even less fortunate. Castillon, Francs, and St. Emilion satellites were hard hit as was Lalande de Pomerol. Most of the area between the Garonne and the Dordogne rivers (which produces mostly wines – red, white, and rosé – that sell for seven-to-fifteen-dollars-a-bottle was hard hit as well. There will be very little Bordeaux Rosé or Clairet from 2017.

The best sites made the best wine even as some great sites were heavily affected by the frost. Dropping down the price scale, wineries normally making medium and lower priced wines were more likely to have made lesser-quality wines or no wine at all. Taking only the top 200 or so chateaux into consideration, 2017 will prove out to be an excellent vintage with more-than-a-handful of outstanding wines.

The Secondary Frost Effect
When people in Bordeaux ask me about Hurricane Harvey, it’s easy to say that I was “unaffected.” After all we got no water in our house and our vehicle’s were undamaged, even though we were flooded in for a couple of days. But were we really unaffected. We had family and friends who did have a lot of water in their homes and who lost vehicles and personal possessions. And the effect on the city affected us as well. So while we didn’t flood, we were affected.

The same is true of the 2017 frost in Bordeaux. While some vines froze and some chateaux lost some-or-all-of-their-crop (the primary frost effect), all the vines of Bordeaux were in some way affected by the cold. Even the vines that showed no primary frost damage were affected in that the cold stopped the vegetative growth of the vine which then had to restart and slowly regain momentum after, in most cases, a several day pause (the secondary frost effect). This growth pause may be at least partly responsible for the freshness and pretty red fruit character the best 2017 wines exhibit.

Playing the Game
Every year during en premierweek, the game is to compare the new vintage to some vintage in the past. This year the game was harder than it’s ever been. The last real frost vintage was 1991 but the frost in 1991 was more widespread and the farming and winemaking were nowhere near the state that they’re in now. From a qualitative standpoint, the better wines (classified growths and equivalent as well as top unclassified properties) produced in 2017 are in or more likely just above the range of 1999, 2008, and 2014 but not at the level of 2009-2010 or 2015-2016. Which is not to say the style is similar to these or any other vintages. In my experience, 2017 is unique. Like 1999, I think the wines are fresh and pretty and will drink well on release but the structure is different and the farming and winemaking now are decades ahead of 1999. Further, the temptation to over-extract was lower in 2017 than in any other recent vintage so the best wines offer a pretty red fruit character with purity and balance. Were there any over extracted wines? Apparently so from what heard about Pavie and Ausone to name a couple but that’s hearsay (as opposed to heresy) as I went to neither place and tasted neither wine. I did taste a few that were close (Pape Clement and Lynch Bages to name two) but none that crossed-the-line.

So qualitatively 2017 (both despite and because of the frost) is enough above average to be considered a selectively excellent if not outstanding vintage. Buy with some caution but do buy (assuming it is priced right) this pretty, age-worthy, balanced, unique vintage. (What is priced right? That’s another game. I’d like to see the ex-cellars prices in euros at or maybe slightly above those of 2014 but not at the level of 2015. If the wines are priced too high, the vintage will not sell as futures.) Even though 2017 has its own unique style, if you enjoyed 1999 or 2008 or 2014, the better part of 2017 is a vintage to buy.And due to that frost, there will be less of it.

2017 and Second Wines
In most vintages, many chateaux’s second wines mirror the style and structure of their grand vin, even if the mirror is a bit foggy. Foggy because the second wines have most often come from the estate’s lesser (a relative term) terroir and are generally made in a style that reflects the grand vin but in an earlier drinking, more approachable way.

In 2017, a lot of the second wines are fresh and pretty but stylistically distinct and different. Some of the second wines were in short or very short supply and some weren’t made at all. Why? The terroir effect of 2017. More and more the second wines come from specific plots that  make very good wines but maybe less good than the plots chosen for the increasingly selective grand vins. This results in the clos that makes the Grand Vin de Ch. Latour and Les Forts vineyards that make Les Forts de Latour and even separate Pauillac vineyards that (along with culls from the other two make the “third wine” Pauillac de Latour. In this scenario, Les Forts essentially becomes a separate wine rather than a “second wine.” The situation is similar for Carruades from Lafite. In the case of Croix de Beaucaillou from Ducru Beaucaillou, Ch. Moulin Riche from Leoville Poyferre and Clos de Marquis from Leoville las Cases, all are now (while sharing winemaking teams and facilities with their former siblings) treated as their own separate properties. Each of the two former Leoville properties now has its own second wine: M de Moulin Riche and La Petite Marquise.

As these terroirs are generally lesser (again a relative term) than the greater terroirs from which they have been separated, the wines sell for less (but often not as much less than they did as actual second wines). What is different about these second wine terroirs? Almost invariably, they are cooler and somewhat more frost prone and in 2017 more likely to have been frost affected both in terms of primary frost damage and the secondary frost effect discussed above.

A Word about Extraction
Several factors are now in-play that are reducing the two decade lean toward over ripeness and the use of more extractive techniques. Part of it is the decline in the influence of Robert Parker and certain other critics. Part of it is a perception among some Bordelaise that this is a Michel Roland wine or that is a Stephen Derenencourt wine – as opposed to a wine of a particular place. Part of it that better farming (a strong lean toward sustainable, organic, or biodynamic) is producing better grapes that producers now realize don’t need to be propped up by aggressive winemaking. Part of it is a bit more ripeness from warmer vintages. And part of it is a string of vintages that have not lent themselves to big extractions (while admittedly avoiding tasting a few notorious extracters). For all of these reasons, we tasted no wines this year that went over the top on extraction – and that’s a good thing.

Bear Dalton with Eiisabeth Jaubert at Ch. Petrus

Impressions
So what did I like best? My tasting notes and scores will follow over the next few days. For now, I’ll invoke the words of an old Bordeaux vigneron who once told me “Tasting wine is like kissing girls. You remember the best. You remember the worst. For the rest you need a diary.”

The 2017 wines seared in my memory were Haut Brion Blanc, Petrus, Le Pin, Margaux, Vieux Ch. Certan, Haut Brion Rouge, Latour, Lafite, Leoville Las Cases (the easiest to taste young las Cases in my experience), Ducru Beaucaillou, Pichon Lalande, Cheval Blanc, La Mission Haut Brion, and Figeac. No surprises there.

The most likely to be under-rated wines of the vintage are the so called second labels of first growth properties Clarence de Haut Brion, Les Forts de Latour, and Pavillon Rouge de Ch. Margaux, all of which are not only excellent but among the very best wines of their respective appellations. Also, no surprises.

Some of the most memorable surprises the 2017 Bordeaux vintage were:
Ch. Troplong Mondot (newowner and new management)
Quintus (the steadily improving St. Emilion property owned by Haut Brion’s Dillon family
R de Rieussec, the dry white wine produced by Sauternes chateau Rieussec – comes across as a sort of baby Haut Brion Blanc (which is high praise indeed).
Ch. Carbonnieux which made both a red and a white that are as good as I have ever tasted.
Ch. Pedesclaux finally living up to the hype it got the last three years for the 2014 2015, 2016, and 2017.
Sauternes second label Carmes de Rieussec offers a sweet but-not-over-the-top, delicious, and refreshing-with-good-acidity value sauternes in a style likely to appeal to much of the US market, maybe more than Ch. Rieussec’s grand vin.

Posts on TRAVELOGUE and TASTING NOTES / SCORES to Follow

Estate Bottled Champagne tasting with Sophie Couvreur

On Wednesday, April 18th at 7pm, please join me in welcoming Sophie Couvreur of Champagne et Villages to the Wine School at l’Alliance Française for a tasting of twelve estate-bottled Champagnes from her portfolio of grower-producers at Champagne et Villages.

Champagne et Villages was created by Paul and Françoise Couvreur in 1998 and is now run by their daughter Sophie. Their business is dedicated to the promotion of boutique grower champagnes. Drawing on Paul’s extensive experience with over 20 years running and marketing major champagne houses, together they have selected a range of quality driven, passionate and individual champagne brands that mirror their own philosophy of quality and commitment. The family has established fantastic relationships with their grower producers  – a testament to their desire to understand the family, their philosophy and practices as much as their wines.

The line up:
VAZART-COQUARTt Blanc de Blancs NV
CAMILLE SAVES Brut 1er Cru NV
JACQUES PICARD Berru Brut NV
MARCEL MOINEAUX Brut Grand Cru NV
JOSE DHONDT Brut Rose de Saignee NV
CAMILLE SAVES Brut Rose Grand Cru
VAZART-COQUART Blanc de Blancs Brut Special Club 2009
SERVEAUX Brut Carte Noire NV
CAMILLE SAVES Brut Gand Cru “Anais Jolie Coeur” 2008
GODME Alouettes St. Bets 1er cru Blanc de Blancs 2008
GODME Champs St. Martin Grand cru Blanc de Noirs 2008
VAZART-COQUART Demi Sec NV

The CHAMPAGNE et VILLAGES Tasting will cost $50.00 per person (Cash or Check) or $52.63 regular. The class will meet at 7pm on Wednesday April 18 at l’Alliance Française. To purchase your ticket, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or coburnsusan2@gmail.com.

L’Alliance Française is the French cultural center in Houston. Located at 427 Lovett Blvd., l’Alliance is on the southeast corner of Lovett and Whitney (one block south of Westheimer and two blocks east of Montrose).

If you buy a ticket and will not be able to attend, please cancel at least 24 hours before the class or you may be charged. Later cancellations will not be charged if we can fill the seat. This is often case as we regularly have waiting lists for these classes.

Taste Domaine de la POUSSE d’OR 2014s with owner Patrick Landanger

Normally, my class invitations start out “Please join me, Spec’s fine wine buyer Bear Dalton for a tasting of …” or words to that effect. Not this time.*
So on Wednesday March 14th at 7pm, please join Burgundy importer David Smith along with Domaine de la Pousse d’Or owner Patrick Landanger and new general manager Benoit Landanger (son of Patrick) at the Wine School at l’Alliance Française for a tasting of ten wines from the Domaine de la Pousse d’Or.

Originally created in 1954, Domaine de la Pousse d’Or has long been among my favorite domaines of Burgundy. I first tasted two of the Volnays in the early 1980s and got to know the range of wines better tasting with Becky Wasserman (who was then their broker) in 1986. I’ve been tasting at the domaine for the last fifteen years. Patrick Landanger purchased the property in 1997 and immediately began investing in bothe the physical plant and the vineyards. Since then, I have watched as Pousse d’Or improved in quality and grew from a Volnay specialist with some Santenay and Pommard to include vines on the hill of Corton (1999), in Puligny Montrachet (2004), and in Chambolle and Morey (2008). At this time Spec’s is able to purchase thirteen wines (one village appellation, nine 1er crus, and three grand crus) from the estate, all of which are consistently excellent. (There are four wines we don’t get – yet.) We’ll taste through ten Pousse d’Or crus from the fine 2014 vintage including nine reds and one white with special attention paid to the specificity of place and process of each wine.

The line up:
Pousse d’Or Santenay Clos Tavannes 1er cru 2014
Pousse d’Or Volnay en Caillerets 1er cru 2014
Pousse d’Or Volnay Clos de la 60 Ouvrees 1er cru 2014
Pousse d’Or Volnay Clos de la Bousse d’Or 1er cru 2014
Pousse d’Or Pommard Jarollieres 1er cru 2014
Pousse d’Or Corton Clos du Roi Grand Cru 2014
Pousse d’Or Chambolle Musigny 2014
Pousse d’Or Chambolle Musigny les Amoureuses 1er cru 2014
Pousse d’Or Clos de la Roche Grand Cru 2014
Pousse d’Or Puligny Montrachet Clos le Caillerets 1er cru 2014

Domaine de la Pousse d’Or 2014 will cost $50.00 per person (Cash or Check) or $52.63 regular. The class will meet at 7pm on Wednesday March 14 at l’Alliance Française. To purchase your ticket, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or coburnsusan2@gmail.com.

L’Alliance Française is the French cultural center in Houston. Located at 427 Lovett Blvd., l’Alliance is on the southeast corner of Lovett and Whitney (one block south of Westheimer and two blocks east of Montrose).

If you buy a ticket and will not be able to attend, please cancel at least 24 hours before the class or you may be charged. Later cancellations will not be charged if we can fill the seat. This is often case as we regularly have waiting lists for these classes.

*I am will be in the hospital on Wednesday recovering from surgery to reconnect my previously rerouted plumbing. I hate to miss this because I love these wines but this is a major step forward in my healing process.

One Week from Today – 2015 (Mostly) Cru Classé Bordeaux Tasting

If you love Bordeaux, this is a can’t miss event. Taste 60+ high quality Bordeaux Wines from the excellent 2015 vintage. Meet and talk with some of the producers. Wallow in Bordeaux wonderfulness.

Tuesday March 6, 2018 at the Crystal Ballroom at the Rice

As most know, this event was originally scheduled for Tuesday January 16, 2018 but we had to cancel due to extreme (for Houston anyway) winter weather conditions. We are sorry for any inconvenience that cancellation may have caused but safety considerations won out. The original plan was to host over 30 Bordeaux chateau owners, directors, and/or winemakers (aka “the Bordelaise”) presenting 62 mostly Cru Classé Bordeaux wines all from the superb 2015 vintage in a standup-and-walk-around tasting format. The wines are here and will be served. Some of the Chateau owners/winemakeers are coming back as well. In any case, there will be someone informed about the wine pouring each wine. In the end, we will have the 2015 tasting and you will get to taste …

Pomerol: Chx. Clinet, Gazin, Croix St. Georges, and La Pointe (along with 2nd vin Ballade de La Pointe)

St. Emilion: Chx. Canon la Gaffeliere, Clos l’Oratoire, Daugay, Grand Corbin Despagne, La Confession, Larcis Ducasse, and Pavie Macquin

St. Georges St. Emilion: Ch. Cap St. George

Castillon and Francs: Chx. d’Aiguilhe and Ampelia, Ch. Puygueraud

Bordeaux: Chx. Croix Mouton and le Conseiller

St. Estephe: Chx. Phelan Segur, Lafon Rochet, and les Ormes de Pez

Pauillac: Chx. Pichon Lalande (with 2nd vin Reserve de la Comtesse), Pichon Baron (with 2nd vin Les Griffons), Pibran, Lynch Bages (with 2nd vin Echo de Lynch Bages), Grand Puy Lacoste (with 2nd vin Lacoste Borie), Clerc Milon, d’Armailhac, and Haut Bages Liberal

St. Julien: Chx. Branaire Ducru, Leoville Barton and Langoa Barton, Leoville Poyferrre, and Talbot

Margaux: Chx. Giscours, Cantenac Brown, Ferriere, du Tertre and Brane Cantenac (along with 2nd vin Baron de Brane)

Haut Medoc, Moulis, Listrac: Chx. Cantemerle, Chasse Spleen, Camensac, Mauvesin Barton, and Senejac

Pessac Leognan Reds: Chx. Carmes Haut Brion, Carbonnieux, Domaine de Chevalier, Smith Haut Lafitte, Clos Marsalette, and Haut Bailly with 2nd vin La Parde de Haut Bailly

Dry Whites: Domaine de Chevalier, Smith Haut Lafitte, and Blanc de Lynch Bages (2014)

Sweet Whites: Chx. Suduiraut (along with 2nd vin Lions de Suduiraut) and Coutet

You can see that we’ll be tasting great wines from every major appellation in Bordeaux. After re-tasting all these wines on January 17 in Dallas, I can tell you that they are showing very well.
The tasting will open at 5pm and run until 9pm, giving you ample time to taste the wines and visit with our guests from Bordeaux. The tasting will include a spread of artisanal cheeses and breads chosen to help absorb the wines and refresh the palate. We will taste from Riedel Degustazione (tasting) glasses. The Vintage 2015 Mostly Cru Classé Bordeaux Tasting will cost $100.00 per person (including a 5% discount for cash or check, regular price is $105.26). To purchase your ticket, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or coburnsusan2@gmail.com.

The Crystal Ballroom at the Rice is located in downtown Houston at 909 Texas Avenue between Travis and Main. Valet Parking will be available.

If you buy a ticket and will not be able to attend, please cancel at least 24 hours before the event. No shows and later cancellations will be charged.

Bear Dalton Health Update

Dear Friends,

I’m posting this because so many people are inquiring that it’s difficult to answer everyone. I am humbled by and deeply appreciate all the prayers and concern. Please feel free to share this.

The old news:
I first realized I had a problem early on the morning of Monday January 29th. Carol drove me to the Methodist emergency room with what I thought was appendicitis. After a CT scan, I was diagnosed with stage-four colon cancer which got me quickly admitted to Methodist hospital. After a day-and-half of scans and tests, pokes and prods, Dr. Eric Haas and his team operated on me beginning at about 4:30pm on Wednesday Jan 31. During the four-hour surgery, they took out a grapefruit-sized tumor and about a foot of colon (along with my appendix and some lymph nodes) and rerouted my plumbing. The labs came back with clean margins so they feel like the got out all the cancer in my gut.
I had a follow up appointment with Dr. Haas last Thursday and got nothing but good news. He said I am 7-10 days ahead of schedule on healing from the surgery. We are working on getting scheduled to reconnect all the plumbing.

Maybe you knew most of that before now. Here’s the new stuff:
Tuesday (2/20) I had a needle biopsy on one of two spots in my liver. Today (Friday, February 23) I had an appointment with my oncologist Dr. Monisha Singh who gave me the unwelcome-but-not-unexpected news that the colon cancer had spread to my liver so I will need chemo-therapy (beginning in mid-April) and some other follow up. I was hoping that wouldn’t be the case but it was not unexpected.
We are getting everything (reconnection surgery and chemo) scheduled around a couple of wine business trips to Europe in April and May. We have a plan. The doctors and the rest of the care team has been great; Carol and I are becoming huge fans of Methodist.

So my energy level improves almost daily. Since I was released from the hospital on the afternoon of February 6th, I’ve walked at least 2 miles every day the weather has permitted; Scout and I walked 3.3 miles today.  And I am really enjoying cooking my own dinners again. Thank you to everyone who has offered to bring food but cooking is a passion for me and I am quite enjoying indulging it. I cooked seared salmon, a sweet potato, and shiso peppers for dinner tonight as Carol – my “health care pit bull” – was at St. Luke’s visiting her only-marginally-more-cooperative-than-me mother Nancy who is once more rallying.  I still get tired sooner than my normal but that’s improving. I’m learning to eat a bit differently to accommodate my modified plumbing. I’m going back to work at Spec’s on Monday and am anxious to get back in the saddle. There have been silver linings: Since the surgery, I have experienced no back pain. And I am steadily losing weight (I now weigh less than I have in over 30 years). On March 3rd, I plan to walk (not run) in the Houston Area Women’s Center’s 5K Race Against Violence. (The Houston Area Women’s Center and ECHOS are my two dearest causes so I’m doing what I can to help and hope you will too. Please click this link for more info on that:
https://www.houstonrav.org/rav-donate/?kwofrid=IIO2HO4)

Also, please join me on March 6th for our rescheduled 2015 Mostly Cru Classé Bordeaux Tasting at the Crystal Ballroom at the Rice. This is an amazing opportunity to taste 60+ fine Bordeaux wines from the excellent 2015 vintage.

So that’s the whole dang deal. Everything is positive (my blood type and life philosophy are the same: B+). With God’s help, we will beat this. Please keep me and Carol and Nancy in your prayers. Wishing all of you all the best.

Thanks be to God.

Bear

Vintage 2015 (Mostly) Cru Classé Bordeaux Tasting on March 6th

Tuesday March 6, 2018 at the Crystal Ballroom at the Rice

(Please see the end of this post for an update on Bear Dalton)

This event was originally scheduled for Tuesday January 16, 2018 but we had to cancel due to extreme winter weather conditions (the “Ice-Pocolypse” that virtually closed the city of Houston). The original plan was to host over 30 Bordeaux chateau owners, directors, and/or winemakers (aka “the Bordelaise”) presenting 62 mostly Cru Classé Bordeaux wines all from the superb 2015 vintage in a standup-and-walk-around tasting format. The wines are here and will be served. The Bordelaise are working-it-out to come back in March. Many will make it but some won’t. In any case, there will be someone informed about the wine pouring each wine. In the end, we will have the 2015 tasting and you will get to taste …

Pomerol: Chx. Clinet, Gazin, Croix St. Georges, and La Pointe (along with 2nd vin Ballade de La Pointe)

St. Emilion: Chx. Canon la Gaffeliere, Clos l’Oratoire, Daugay, Grand Corbin Despagne, La Confession, Larcis Ducasse, and Pavie Macquin

St. Georges St. Emilion: Ch. Cap St. George

Castillon and Francs: Chx. d’Aiguilhe and Ampelia, Ch. Puygueraud

Bordeaux: Chx. Croix Mouton and le Conseiller

St. Estephe: Chx. Phelan Segur, Lafon Rochet, and les Ormes de Pez

Pauillac: Chx. Pichon Lalande (with 2nd vin Reserve de la Comtesse), Pichon Baron (with 2nd vin Les Griffons), Pibran, Lynch Bages (with 2nd vin Echo de Lynch Bages), Grand Puy Lacoste (with 2nd vin Lacoste Borie), Clerc Milon, d’Armailhac, and Haut Bages Liberal

St. Julien: Chx. Branaire Ducru, Leoville Barton and Langoa Barton, Leoville Poyferrre, and Talbot

Margaux: Chx. Giscours, Cantenac Brown, Ferriere, du Tertre and Brane Cantenac (along with 2nd vin Baron de Brane)

Haut Medoc, Moulis, Listrac: Chx. Cantemerle, Chasse Spleen, Camensac, Mauvesin Barton, and Senejac

Pessac Leognan Reds: Chx. Carmes Haut Brion, Carbonnieux, Domaine de Chevalier, Smith Haut Lafitte, Clos Marsalette, and Haut Bailly with 2nd vin La Parde de Haut Bailly

Dry Whites: Domaine de Chevalier, Ch. Smith Haut Lafitte, Ch. Carbonnieux, and Blanc de Lynch Bages (2014)

Sweet Whites: Chx. Suduiraut (along with 2nd vin Lions de Suduiraut) and Coutet

We’ll be tasting great wines from every major appellation in Bordeaux. After re-tasting all these wines on January 17 in Dallas, I can tell you that they are showing very well.
The tasting will open at 5pm and run until 9pm, giving you ample time to taste the wines and visit with our guests from Bordeaux. The tasting will include a spread of artisanal cheeses and breads chosen to help absorb the wines and refresh the palate. We will taste from Riedel Degustazione (tasting) glasses. The Vintage 2015 Mostly Cru Classé Bordeaux Tasting will cost $100.00 per person (including a 5% discount for cash or check, regular price is $105.26). To purchase your ticket, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or coburnsusan2@gmail.com.

The Crystal Ballroom at the Rice is located in downtown Houston at 909 Texas Avenue between Travis and Main. Valet Parking will be available.

If you buy a ticket and will not be able to attend, please cancel at least 24 hours before the event. No shows and later cancellations will be charged.

 

About BEAR DALTON
As many of you know, on Monday, January 29th at about 6am, my wife Carol drove me to the Methodist Emergency Room on the Southwest freeway at Kirby with what we assumed was appendicitis. By 10:30am, we were informed that it was not appendicitis. Rather, I had stage 4 colon cancer. I was admitted and transported via ambulance to Methodist Hospital. After a long day-and-a-half of tests and scans, I had a four-hour surgery on Wednesday afternoon that cut out all the cancer in my colon along with my appendix and some lymph nodes. They say they got it all. Plumbing has been redone and rerouted. I was up walking a few steps and sitting up Wednesday night. I was discharged a week after my surgery. Every day is better now. It has been over a week since I’ve taken any pain meds and I am not hurting. I’m walking  at least 2 miles every day. All my doctors’ comments have been very positive. All good news. They say I am 7-10 days ahead of schedule on my recovery and anticipate a full recovery and that I should be able to resume my normal activity (Ok, maybe toned down a little bit) over the next 4-6 weeks.And I feel pretty good. My energy level is up. I still get tired but I am feeling stronger every day. My spirits are good. I know I am in God’s hands. I am humbled to have more people than I can count praying for me. And Carol has been a rock.

Obviously, I will still host our rescheduled 2015 Cru Classé Bordeaux event on March 6th at the Crystal Ballroom at the Rice (which would still go on whether I could be there or not). And my customer trip to the UK, Cahors, and Bordeaux is a “Go.” And I’ll be scheduling a couple of classes at the Wine School at l’Alliance Française soon.

I cannot say enough good things about the care I have received at Methodist. The doctors are exceptional and the nursing care has been super. Please continue to pray for me but know that I am on the mend and with God’s help will be just fine.

 

Update on Bear Dalton

On Monday, January 29th at about 6am, my wife Carol drove me to the Methodist Emergency Room (aka “The Chick-fil-A ER”) on the Southwest freeway at Kirby with what we assumed was appendicitis. By 10:30am, we were informed that it was not appendicitis. Rather, it seemed I had stage 4 colon cancer. I was admitted and transported via ambulance (not something I ever want to do again) to Methodist Hospital in the medical center. After a long day-and-a-half of tests and scans, I had a four-hour surgery on Wednesday afternoon that cut out all the cancer in my colon along with my appendix and some lymph nodes. They say they got it all. Plumbing has been redone and rerouted. I was up walking a few steps and sitting up Wednesday night. Every day is better now. It has been over 12 hours since I have had any pain meds and I am not (at this moment anyway) hurting. I’m up walking laps on the hospital floor. I got in 2.2 miles yesterday. If things line up properly, I may get discharged today. The plan is for me to go home and rest and recover, and to continue to walk and build up. At some point, I will have a biopsy on two small spots on my liver. Other than that, there seems to be no remaining cancer in my body.

So how am I? Actually, I feel pretty good and that’s with no pain meds in over 12 hours. My energy level is up. I still and will get tired but that’s what the next couple of weeks are for. I feel quite lucky that all this happened when and as it did because there was a real possibility my colon could have ruptured which would have added layers of difficulty to all of this. My spirits are good. I know I am in God’s hands and that I have more people than I can count praying for me. I cannot begin to say how much I appreciate that. Carol has been a rock.

Why am I telling you all this? Well, frankly, a lot of you have asked. And I’ve heard rumors that I am in much more dire shape than in fact I am. My doctors all expect a full recovery and that I should be able to resume my normal activity (Ok, maybe toned down a little bit) over the next 4-6 weeks.

I still plan to host our rescheduled 2015 Cru Classé Bordeaux event on March 6th at the Crystal Ballroom at the Rice (which would still go on whether I could be there or not). And my customer trip to the UK, Cahors, and Bordeaux is a “Go.” And I’ll be scheduling a couple of classes at the Wine School at l’Alliance Française soon.

I cannot say enough good things about the care I have received at Methodist. The doctors are exceptional and the nursing care has been super. Please continue to pray for me but know that I am on the mend and with God’s help will be just fine.