Adelsheim Tasting

On Monday July 8th at 7pm, please join me in welcoming Willamette Valley pioneer David Adelsheim (please “about David Adelsheim” below) to the Wine School at l’Alliance Française for a tasting of ten of his wines. David will present his wines as he delves into the history of both Adelsheim and the Willamette Valley. He has seen and done it all in the Willamette Valley and is here to tell the tale.

The Wines:
Adelsheim Pinot Noir Rose 2018
Adelsheim Willamette Valley Chardonnay 2016
Adelsheim Willamette Valley Chardonnay 2017
Adelsheim Stacking Claim Chardonnay 2015
Adelsheim Ribbon Springs Chardonnay 2016
Adelsheim Willamette Valley Pinot Noir 2017
Adelsheim Breaking Ground Pinot Noir 2015
Adelsheim Elizabeth’s Reserve Pinot Noir 2014
Adelsheim Ribbon Springs Vineyard  Pinot Noir 2016
Adelsheim Boulder Bluff Vineyard Pinot Noir 2016

This Adelsheim Tasting will cost $40.00 per person (cash or check) or $42.11 regular. The class will meet at 7pm on Monday July 8th at l’Alliance Française. To purchase your ticket, please contact Susan at 713-854-7855 or coburnsusan2@gmail.com.

L’Alliance Française is the French cultural center in Houston. Located at 427 Lovett Blvd., l’Alliance is on the southeast corner of Lovett and Whitney (one block south of Westheimer and two blocks east of Montrose).

If you buy a ticket and will not be able to attend, please cancel at least 24 hours before the class or you may be charged. Later cancellations will not be charged if we can fill the seat. This is often case as we regularly have waiting lists for these classes.

About David Adelsheim:
David Adelsheim is the director of Adelsheim Vineyard, which he founded with Ginny Adelsheim in 1971. In the course of his company’s 48-year history, he has been the vineyard manager, winemaker, and the person in charge of sales, marketing, accounting, and fixing broken plumbing. His early winemaking experience included work at the experimental winery of the Lycée Viticole in Beaune, France, and at The Eyrie Vineyards in Oregon.
“In the beginning, in the 1970s, we needed to focus on learning to make consistently decent wine. As the Willamette Valley was able to draw on more training and expertise in the 80s and 90s, producing world-class Pinots became the goal. Now, our conversations are all about the distinctions of place – what should a great Pinot from this particular vineyard taste like?”